Showing your work

A whole bunch of Captain America scenes were cut from The Avengers, including this Stan Lee cameo.

A whole bunch of Captain America scenes were cut from The Avengers, including this Stan Lee cameo.

I enjoy watching the deleted scenes on DVDs. In the deleted scenes of Joss Whedon's The Avengers, there is an entirely different opening and closing. On the DVD for Pixar's Wreck it Ralph, there's a bunch of scenes centering around Ralph having a song that he would sing over and over. Personally, I'm glad these scenes didn't make it into the final movie.

Most of the deleted scenes are also accompanied by a director's commentary describing why they ended up on the cutting room floor. Often, the cuts are needed to fix pacing or flow. Or the movie is just too long. Sometimes, the director loved a scene, but it just doesn't work in the final film. It's just part of the process of refining the finished product.

99.9% of the time, I completely understand why the edits were made. And it makes me appreciate the final product that much more.

Filmmaking is one of the only creative endeavors that celebrates the editing process. Print and web designers don't normally show the process of their work.

I suppose some of that sharing happens on sites like Dribbble. And I've met a couple of designers that show clients the process as part of the pitch. But for the most part, designers tend to shy away from showing how they arrived at the final design and what difficult decisions were made along the way.

Designers often complain that clients don't respect all the work that goes into the creative process. Maybe if we let them see the "cutting room floor" they'll value the end product even more.

Bob Wertz

Husband, Dad (x3), Creative Director at @UofSC, Type Designer, Teacher and Volunteer. Blogs at Sketchbook B and Wanted in Columbia.