Microblogging Cross Posting

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I'm wondering how much I'll use Micro.Blog's cross posting features.

Facebook Memories shows you what you posted on this day in previous years. And eight years ago, I was cross posting everything from Twitter to Facebook. 

It didn’t take long for me to figure out this wasn’t the best approach for me. My Twitter followers are mostly professional acquaintances. My Facebook friends mostly want to see pictures of my children. So I stopped cross posting.

Today, the only crossposting I do is through Buffer to schedule posts on Twitter, Facebook, LInkedIn and more. But I select and customize the posts based on where they are running.

I’m thinking about how I’ll use Micro.Blog. Lots of people are interested in figuring out how cross posting works so they can post to Twitter and Micro.Blog at the same time. I understand why this a primary part of the platform — cross posting to Twitter gives people a way to try out Micro.Blog without investing significantly more time. But I’m thinking that I’ll largely avoid cross posting for two reasons:

My communities are different. I’m not sure what the community at Micro.Blog will be like, but I imagine they won’t mirror my design-heavy corner of the Twitter universe. (At least not initially. I'm pretty confident Micro.Blog will have a compelling story to tell to creative professionals. Look for a future blog post...)

I’m excited about the unique aspects of Micro.Blog. Twitter allows for 140 characters. Micro.Blog allows for 280 character posts. I don’t really expect to write much longer posts, but I do look forward to not having to rewrite sentences or butcher punctuation to fit a tweet under the 140 character limit. And Micro.Blog allows inline links and simple formatting with Markdown. That’s lost when I cross post to Twitter.

I'm looking forward to the launch of Micro.Blog and figuring out all the logistical issues like cross posting. Hopefully, the service will evolve to the point where cross posting isn't necessary.


Bob Wertz writes about design, technology and pop culture at Sketchbook B. Bob is a Columbia, South Carolina-based designer, creative director, college instructor, husband and dad. He’s particularly obsessed with typography, the creative process and the tools we use to create. In his spare time, he is thinking differently about Twitter. Follow Bob on Twitter and Instagram.

The early bird gets…

Why does everyone wants to be first?

The fifth post in my ongoing series on conventional wisdom.

In 1670, John Ray published the proverb ”The early bird catcheth the worm." More than three centuries later, we’re still obsessed with being first.

First to post something on social media.

First to buy the newest gadget.

First to meet with a client.

But let’s take the proverb to it’s unstated, but logical conclusion: “The early bird gets the worm; the lazy, slacker second bird gets nothing.” And I’m not sure that’s good advice.

There are absolutely advantages to getting there first. If you are the first company to bring a new product to market, you have a distinct advantage against your competitors. In news, being the first to report “breaking” news draws viewers. 

But our obsession with being first doesn’t always make a whole lot of sense. You don’t have to be first to be successful. I might argue that:

The early bird gets the early worms.

Your business strategy might be build around getting the “early worms.” The tech company with a cutting edge product gets the early adopter consumer who will pay a premium. Many companies have successful business strategies centered around being first.

But there are also advantages to being second. You can see what your competitor is doing. Learn from their mistakes. You might miss out on the “early worms,” but in today’s international marketplace, there are plenty of “worms” all over the world to sell to.

Apple is one of the world’s most valuable companies. They weren’t the first to develop the computer. Or the portable music player. Or the smartphone. They don’t try to always be first. They strive to be the best. And they’ve been successful with that strategy.

So there is a reason to be first. And a reason to be second.


Bob Wertz writes about design, technology and pop culture at Sketchbook B. Bob is a Columbia, South Carolina-based designer, creative director, college instructor, husband and dad. He’s particularly obsessed with typography, the creative process and the tools we use to create. In his spare time, he is trying to get more sleep and wake up earlier... Follow Bob on Twitter and Instagram.

Slow and steady wins…

Does speed always lose?

The fourth post in my ongoing series on conventional wisdom.

We all know the story of the tortoise and the hare. It’s one of Aesops fables and has been a staple of conventional wisdom since around 600 BCE.

The hare challenges the tortoise to a race. Gets cocky. Takes a nap in the middle of a race. The tortoise passes him and wins. And the moral of the story is: Slow and steady wins the race.

Wait! Except that’s not the moral at all. The moral is “Don’t get cocky and lose focus.” The tortoise was slow and steady, and yes, he wins. But if the hare doesn’t goof off, the tortoise loses in a landslide.

So why do we all remember “slow and steady wins the race?” Because I think it’s a comforting thought. If you work slowly and methodically, you will succeed no matter how quick your competition is. I fear that’s bad advice in today’s fast moving world.

I hear echoes of “slow and steady” all the time, with the distinct impression that slow somehow equals strategic and fast equals reckless. I don’t buy into that. I think it’s a oversimplification of reality.

First of all, everything depends on the “race.” I could believe that slow and steady wins the really long endurance race. But fast always wins in a shorter race.

I’m still not sure that’s right, though. There are people and companies that can move quickly without losing focus. And those people are going to win the short races and the long races, too. 

Perhaps the true moral of the story has nothing at all to do with speed and everything to do with consistency:

It doesn’t matter if you are fast or slow, steady wins the race.

Let’s just take speed out of the equation. Being consistent is key. Don’t slack off if you have a lead. Don’t quit if you fall behind.

The hare wasn’t true to his talent, slacked off and lost focus. The tortoise moved as fast as he could. In the end, the tortoise’s consistency was the key to success — not his slow pace.


Bob Wertz writes about design, technology and pop culture at Sketchbook B. Bob is a Columbia, South Carolina-based designer, creative director, college instructor, husband and dad. He’s particularly obsessed with typography, the creative process and the tools we use to create. In his spare time, he is trying to get back into running... slowly. Follow Bob on Twitter and Instagram.